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Amateur radio operators exchange QSL "postcards" to confirm two-way communications (QSO) between stations. A QSL card sent from one amateur radio operator to another contains details about the contact and the station. As a minimum, this includes the call sign of both stations participating in the communications, the time and date of the contact (usually specified in UTC/GMT), the frequency used, the mode of transmission used, and a signal report. The latter report is a two or three digit number that expresses the quality of the signals being received: RST for "Readability" (1-5), "Strength" (1-9), and "Tone" (1-9) of CW/Morse Code communications, RS for voice, RSV for SSTV (V = "Video", 1-5), and RSQ for digi-modes. Note: "QSO" and "QSL" are only two of the over 200 standard "Q-code" abbreviations that are used in Morse telegraphy. Their usage goes back to 1906.




MY OWN QSL CARD

QSL card

My QSL card - 2008-2016


QSL card

My QSL card - since 2016


SOME QSL CARDS THAT I HAVE RECEIVED

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©1999-2016 F. Dörenberg, unless stated otherwise. All rights reserved worldwide. No part of this publication may be used without permission from the author.