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This is the on-line repository of my favorite recipes - my own creations, and from others. Disclaimer: as these are some of my favorite recipes, there is no guarantee that you will like them. And of course, there just might be a secret ingredient (or two, ha ha). I could disclose them for a nominal fee, or some other commensurate incentive...... Anyway, enjoy the cooking or baking and let me know how it came out!



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Frank with turkey

Myself with the Thanksgiving turkey, in our kitchen in Sammamish/WA 1997


QUOTES

Some of my favorite quotes about food and cooking:

"I love cooking with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food!"

W.C. Fields (more great quotes from Mr Fields - on all sorts of topics - are here).

"Bakers are trustworthy men, as is demonstrated every day when they open their shops at four in the morning, in order that we may have fresh, tasty bread for our tables. Cooks, on the other hand, are little more than scoundrels, and even if they succeed in putting foods on our tables, we never know what terrible things are hidden beneath their dark and smelling sauces."

Diphilus of Siphnos (4th century B.C. Greek playwright)

"When I read about the evils of drinking, I immediately gave up reading!"

Henny Youngman

My tip of the decade (2010), possibly of the century. I'm sure you know that one of the better tricks to avoid crying when cutting onions (besides using a very sharp knife and chilling the onions), is to keep a decent swig of water in your mouth and slowly swizzle it around. Guess what: after extensive experimentation, I have concluded that this works just as well with wine! However, I do remember that I had to swallow and replenish the swig of wine quite a number of times...

Never leave the blade of your food processor in the sink or in the drip rack: wash it, dry it off, put it away! Believe me - I had a "sink" encounter with a new blade, the blade won, and now my thumb has a 2-3 cm (1 inch) scar on it!

WEIGHTS, VOLUMES, TEMPERATURES

Some parts of the world have not adopted the European decimal system. Instead, they (still) use old British "imperial" measurements and derivatives (i.e., US). Most of the recipes on this website are not given in both. Below are some conversions between standard weights, volumes, and temperatures. US recipes typically use volume measurements where Europeans would use both weights and volumes. This is usually only an issue for some special pastry recipes, where, e.g., eggs whites must be absolutely be weighed to the gram. Note: on this website, non-European weights and volumes are given in US units, not "British Imperial" - the difference is about 10%! Also: volume measures such as "teaspoon" and "tablespoon" are well-defined, and not spoons you have in your kitchen drawer. Use measuring spoons - and always "flat". Decent recipes do not call for a "heaping spoon" or "rounded spoon" or similar bogus measures. 

Unit conversion - volume

Unit conversion - volume

Unit conversion - weight

Unit conversion - volume

Flour type equivalents

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©1987-2017 F. Dörenberg, unless stated otherwise. All rights reserved worldwide. No part of this publication may be used without permission from the author.

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